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what birds have green heads

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Lucifer Hummingbird: Small hummingbird, metallic green upperparts, head, sides, flared purple-red gorget (throat feathers) extending around sides of neck, white breast and belly. Tail is dark and deeply forked. Bill is long and decurved. Direct and hovering flight on rapid wing beats.
Green-breasted Mango: Medium-sized hummingbird, glittering green overall with decurved, black bill, and purple chin. The slightly notched brown-purple tail has two bronze-green central tail feathers. Feeds on nectar and insects. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Buff-bellied Hummingbird: Medium-sized hummingbird with iridescent green upperparts, head, throat, and upper breast, and buff lower breast and belly. Slightly forked tail is dark chestnut-brown with cinnamon-brown undertail coverts. Bill is slightly decurved and red with a black tip.
Xantus's Hummingbird: Small hummingbird with glittering green upperparts, head, throat, and breast, black face with distinct white stripe behind eye, and cinnamon-brown belly. Squared tail is rufous. Feeds on nectar and insects. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Plain-capped Starthroat: Medium-sized hummingbird with iridescent bronze-green upperparts and head, red throat, white face interrupted by black eyestripe, and pale gray underparts. Slightly notched tail is bronze-green with white-tipped black terminal band. Direct and hovering flight.
White-eared Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird, iridescent green upperparts and throat, metallic violet head, black mask, white stripe with lower black border behind eye, and white belly. Bill is red with black tip. Feeds primarily on nectar. Direct, hovering flight with rapid wing beats.
Yellow-chevroned Parakeet: Medium parakeet, green overall with paler green underparts. The wings are green with yellow bar; underwing coverts are yellow-green. Buff bill. Pink-gray legs and feet. Feeds on seeds, fruit in native habitat, feral populations have adapted to take in blossoms and nectar.
White-winged Parakeet: A medium-sized parakeet, green overall with yellow-and-white wing patches, and pale, teardrop-shaped eye-ring. The green tail is long and pointed. Hooked bill varies in color from yellow-pink to olive-brown. Legs and feet are pink-gray. Swift direct flight on rapid wing beats.
Monk Parakeet: Medium parakeet, green overall, gray forehead, cheeks, lores, throat. Breast is gray, variably barred by dark edges on feathers. Pale pink bill. Belly; lower back, and rump are yellow-green. Wings are dull green with blue flight feathers. Tail is green above with central blue shafts.
Red-crowned Parrot: This medium-sized parrot has dark-scaled green upperparts, pale green underparts, bright red forehead, crown and lores, violet blue neck sides and a yellow-pink bill. First five outer secondaries are red with violet blue tips; black primaries slightly tinged with dark blue tips. Feeds on fruits and flowers. Swift direct flight on rapidly beating wings. Sexes are similar.
Green Parakeet: Fairly large all green parakeet, may show scattered orange or red feathers on breast. In flight the underside of flight feathers show metallic yellow and there may be scattered yellow feathers on leading edge of wing. Swift dirct flight on rapid wing beats, often high above terrain.
Blue-crowned Parakeet: Medium-sized green parakeet with a blue head and red-orange highlights in long tail. White, feathless eye ring. The bill is bicolored with upper mandible pinkish and lower mandible is black (subspecies in northeastern Brazil has an all-pink bill). The legs and feet are pink.
Mitred Parakeet: This fairly large green parakeet has a red forehead grading into scattered bright red feathers on the crown, face, cheek, and at times on the bend in the wing. Its dull green underparts are faintly washed olive, the hooked bill is dull yellow, and the legs and feet are gray. It feeds on fruits, berries and nuts. It has a fast direct flight with rapid wing beats. Sexes are similar.
Yellow-headed Parrot: Large green parrot with yellow head. Flight feathers all tipped blue-black, patch of red on secondary feathers and at bend in wing. Curved yellow beak, gray legs and feet. Feeds on fruits, seeds, and buds. Classified as an Endangered Species owing to rapid population decline.
Orange-winged Parrot: Medium green parrot, yellow head, broad blue eyebrow. Small red-orange patch in secondary feathers while perched and in flight. Green tail has yellow to orange base in outer feathers. Hooked bill is dull yellow with a dark tip. Legs and feet are gray.
Budgerigar: Small parakeet, mostly green in its wild form and may have varying amounts blue, white, or yellow in feral U.S. populations. Has a characteristic pug face, and most have finely barred upperparts. Feeds primarily on grass seeds. Birds in a flock fly in a charecteristic undulating manner.
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Pelagic Cormorant: Small cormorant with glossy black body and bold white patches on flanks. Red face and throat pouch. Head and neck are held straight in flight, with head appearing no wider than neck. Feeds on fish, crustaceans and other invertebrates. Graceful direct flight with rapid wing beats.
Green Jay: Medium, tropical jay with green back, yellow underparts, and distinct black bib. Head and nape are pale blue and has a short crest. Tail is long, blue-green, and yellow-edged. Bill, legs and feet are black. Omnivorous. Direct flight with steady bouyant wing beats. Glides between perches.
Anna's Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird; male has bronze-green upperparts, dull gray underparts. Hood and throat are iridescent red, may appear black or dark purple in low light; broken white eye-ring is usually visible. Tail is dark green with black outer tail feathers. Feeds on nectar, insects, spiders, and sap.
Allen's Hummingbird: Small, compact hummingbird; male has straight black bill, glittering green crown and back, white breast, and rufous sides, belly, rump, and tail. The throat (gorget) is iridescent copper-red. Female similar but lacks bright gorget. Feeds on nectar, insects, spiders, and sap. Swift direct flight, hovers when feeding.
Lewis's Woodpecker: Medium woodpecker with dark green-black upperparts and hood. Face is dark red, collar is gray, belly is pale red. The bill, legs and feet are black. It was named for Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Its dark plumage sets it apart from all other North American woodpeckers.
Black-chinned Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird with metallic green upperparts, gray underparts, white breast, green-washed flanks. Head appears black overall with white spot behind eye; cap is very dark green. Throat is iridescent violet; bill is long and slightly decurved. Forked tail is dark green with black outer tail feathers.
Blue-throated Hummingbird: Large hummingbird with bronze-green upperparts, bronze-brown rump, brilliant purple-blue throat, gray underparts. Tail is dark, occasionally washed with blue-black, and has white corners. Feeds on nectar and insects. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Calliope Hummingbird: Very small hummingbird, metallic green upperparts and flanks, white underparts. Throat feathers are long, purple-red, appearing as streaks on a white background, whiskers when fluffed out, or dark, inverted V when folded. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Broad-tailed Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird with green upperparts and flanks, iridescent red throat, and gray underparts. Dark green tail may show some rufous. Black bill is long and straight. Black legs, feet. Feeds on nectar, spiders, sap and insects. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Ruby-throated Hummingbird: Medium hummingbird, iridescent green upperparts, head, flanks. Underparts are pale gray, paler breast, green wash on sides, belly; throat is bright red with black chin. Tail is dark, forked. Feeds primarily on nectar. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Violet-crowned Hummingbird: Medium-sized hummingbird with iridescent bronze-green upperparts and white underparts. Cap is purple-blue; throat is white and lacks gorget feathers. The bill is bright red with black tip. Feeds on nectar and insects. Direct and hovering flight with very rapid wing beats.
Arctic Warbler: Medium-sized, active warbler with stout bill, olive-green back, olive-brown sides, and white throat and belly. Dark eye-lines contrast with pale yellow eyebrows curving upward behind eyes. Wings have faint pale bar on tips of greater coverts. Tail is square. Pale yellow legs, feet.
Indian Peafowl: This large peacock has a glossy iridescent blue head, neck and breast, white patches above and below the eye, a fan-shaped blue crest, and a long train of striking tail feathers with colorful eye-spots on each one. Feeds on seeds and insects. Female lacks the train and has a green lower neck and duller plumage. Direct flight with rapid wing beats. One of the largest flying birds. Formerly Common Peafowl, the name was changed in 2014 by the American Ornithologist Union.
Purple Gallinule: Medium, chicken-like marsh bird with purple-blue upperparts washed with iridescent green, deep blue underparts. Forehead is pale blue; bill is red and yellow-tipped. Undertail coverts are white. Legs are yellow with very long toes. The flight is labored and slow with dangling legs.
Bahama Woodstar: Medium hummingbird, iridescent green upperparts, violet-pink throat, partial white collar, and mixed buff- and olive-green underparts; may have pink-tinged forehead. Forked tail is black with orange-brown center. Bill is slightly decurved. Direct and hovering flight. The Bahama Woodstar was split into the Bahama Woodstar and the Inagua Woodstar (not in North American range) in 2014 by the American Ornithologist Union.
Mexican Violetear: Medium hummingbird, dark metallic green (appearing black in low light) with blue-violet cheek and breast patches. Wings have black primaries. Squared tail is blue-green with black band. Slightly decurved bill is black. Direct, hovering flight with rapid wing beats. Formerly called the Green Violetear, it has had its name changed to Mexican Violetear and has also been split by the American Ornithologist Union in 2016 into the Mexican Violetear and Lesser Violetear (out of North American range).
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