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what birds have yellow heads

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Altamira Oriole: Largest North American oriole, bright yellow-orange body, black back, mask, bib, and tail. Bill is black. Wings are black with white bar and feather edges. Gray legs and feet. Feeds on caterpillars, insects, fruits, and berries. Swift, strong flight on rapid wing beats.
Yellow Grosbeak: Large finch, yellow overall with black streaks on back. Bill is large and triangular with black upper mandible and gray lower mandible. Black wings have two white bars and black tail coverts have bold white tips. Alternates rapid wing beats with wings pulled to sides.
Saffron Finch: Native to South America, this finch has yellow-green upperparts, yellow underparts, and an orange crown. Wing and tail feathers are black edged with yellow; gray upper mandible and ivory lower mandible, pink-gray legs and feet. The female is more dull in color and has paler underparts. Feeds on insects, greens and oats. Undulating flight, alternates flapping and gliding.
Hawaii Amakihi: AKA the Common Amakihi. It has olive to yellow-green upperparts and yellow underparts. The lores are black and the bill is black and decurved. The wings and tail are olive-gray and the legs and feet are gray. Flight is strong and direct in the forest canopy; may undulate over long distances. It feeds on nectar, spiders and insects. The female tends to be darker than the male.
Laysan Finch: Large, curious Hawaiian honeycreeper. Bright yellow head, neck, breast. Neck has a gray collar, belly is white. Olive back may show narrow brown streaks. Lower back, rump are gray, wings are olive to brown. Large, gray bill, black legs and feet. Prefers to run or hop along the ground.
Maui Alauahio: This small songbird has a mostly yellow head and underparts and an olive crown and upperparts. It has olive-gray edging to the feathers in the wing and tail. Medium length, sharp, fine gray-black bill, with buff lower mandible; medium length wings and notched tail. Female is similar in pattern, but all colors are muted. Feeds on a variety of arthropods. Direct, undulating flight.
Palila: This large finch-billed honeycreeper is endemic to Hawaii. It has a yellow head with black lores separated from a gray back by a distinct line. It has a yellow breast, white belly, gray back, olive-green wings and tail and black legs and feet. The females are more subdued in color. Feeds primarily on seeds. Strong, bouncy flight with steady wing beats.
Kauai Amakihi: This small honeycreeper is olive-green above and pale yellow to creamy gray below. Brown lores, pale yellow supercilium, chin and throat, and gray wings and tail. Gray decurved bill, legs and feet. Feeds on insects and nectar. Strong and direct flight in canopy, may undulate over long distances. Sexes are similar. One of the least specialized and most adaptable Hawaiian species.
Akiapolaau: This small songbird has an olive back and rump, yellow head with black lores, and yellow underparts with a white underbelly and vent. It has a slender, decurved upper mandible. Females are smaller and paler than males. It drills deep holes in ohia trees to drink the sap within. It also uses its unique bill to pick out arthropods from beneath the bark. It has an undulating flight.
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Western Tanager: Medium-sized tanager with brilliant red head, bright yellow body, black back, wings, and tail. Wings have two bars: upper bar is yellow, lower bar is white. Legs and feet are gray. Female is olive-green above, with gray back and yellow underparts. Swift direct flight on rapidly beating wings. It was first recorded on the Lewis and Clark expedition.
Bullock's Oriole: Medium oriole, mostly bright orange with black crown, eye-line, throat stripe, back, and central tail. Wings are black with large white patches. Forages in trees and bushes. Feeds on insects, caterpillars, fruits and berries. Sips nectar. Strong direct flight with rapid wing beats.
Lesser Goldfinch: Small finch with dark back (black in the east, dark green in the west), black crown, bright yellow underparts. Wings, tail black with white markings. Forages in shrubs, brush, weedy fields for seeds and insects. Swift flight, alternates rapid wing beats with wings pulled to sides.
Wilson's Warbler: Small warbler with olive-green upperparts, bright yellow face and underparts, distinct black cap. It has a long, olive-brown tail which it moves up and down, or in a circular fashion, as it searches for food. It is more common in the West than in the East. Legs and feet are pink.
Blackburnian Warbler: Medium warbler, yellow-orange head, black cap and cheek patch, and orange throat. Upperparts are black with white stripes and underparts are white with black- streaked flanks. Wings have prominent white patches. The tail is black with white on outer tail feathers.
Kentucky Warbler: Medium, ground-dwelling warbler with bright olive-green upperparts and yellow underparts. Head has black mask and sideburns and thick yellow eyebrows. Bill is black, legs and feet are pink. Secretive, heard rather than seen. It is named for the state where it was first discovered.
Black-throated Green Warbler: Medium-sized warbler with olive-green upperparts, black-streaked flanks, and white underparts. Face is yellow with black eyestripe and bill. Crown is olive green. Throat and upper breast are black. Wings are dark with two white bars. Tail is dark. Black legs and feet.
Evening Grosbeak: Large, stocky finch. The male has a bright yellow back, rump, and underparts. Head is dark brown with heavy, pale bill; bright yellow eyebrows extend onto forehead. Wings are dark with bold white secondary patches; tail is dark. The female and juvenile females are similar, but grayer and with white-tipped tails; secondary wing patch is gray and base of inner primaries are white. Juvenile male resembles female, but have white secondaries. Feeds on insects, buds, sap, seeds, fruits and berries. Swift bounding flight.
Prairie Warbler: Small warbler, brown-streaked, olive-green upperparts with reddish-brown streaking, bright yellow underparts with black streaks on sides. Head has a yellow-green cap, yellow face, and dark eye, cheek stripes. Found in pine stands, mangroves and overgrown fields rather than prairies.
Blue-winged Warbler: Medium-sized warbler with olive-green upperparts and yellow underparts. The head is yellow with thin black eye line and olive-green nape. Wings are dark gray with two white bars. When its range overlaps with the Golden-winged Warrbler, it often interbreeds with or displaces it.
Prothonotary Warbler: Medium-sized warbler with olive-green back and blue-gray wings and tail. Head, neck, and underparts are vibrant yellow and the undertail coverts are white. Bill, legs and feet are black. The only eastern warbler that nests in tree hollows. Once called the Golden Swamp Warbler.
Yellow Warbler: Small warbler with olive-yellow upperparts and bright yellow underparts with rust-brown streaks on breast, sides. Wings are dark. Tail is dark with yellow-tinged edges. Female lacks streaks on breast. The Golden group has an olive-brown crown and is found in the Florida Keys and West Indies. The Mangrove group has a rufous hood and is found in Central America and northern South America. Has a wider range than any other North American warbler. Eats insects, larvae, and some fruit.
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